While we love BBC content, it can be quite a bummer when that show you never got time to watch straight away disappears from iPlayer.

Well, it looks like the service may finally be getting the go-ahead from regulator Ofcom to allow shows to stay on the site for 12 months rather than 30 days.

The regulator has given “provisional” approval for the changes as the BBC tries to compete with rival streaming services such as Netflix and NOW TV.

Sid Gentle Films/Nick BriggsBBC

Ofcom said that “over time” the changes “could generate significant public value”, though will make its final decision in August.

“It’s great news for audiences if they are able to watch BBC iPlayer for a year, along with full boxsets of selected returning titles and programmes from the BBC archive,” the BBC said in a statement.

“It will give viewers more value for their licence fee and mean we can better keep up with their growing expectations.

“Restricting the BBC to having programmes on iPlayer for 30 days no longer makes sense in a world where global streaming services can offer unlimited boxsets for as long as they want.

“We hope Ofcom can now confirm its decision swiftly so we can start giving licence fee payers the BBC iPlayer they want and deserve.”

David Attenborough, Dynasties tv show
BBC

Related: Free TV licence will no longer be available for over 75s, BBC confirms

While news bulletins, some sports coverage and other shows that have to be removed for legal or editorial reasons are taken down within 30 days, luckily, many programmes are already available for a year or more, such as Killing Eve and Dynasties.

However, other times vary, with popular new series Years and Years currently only available for three months – so it will be nice for a consistent length across the board.


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